Quality Vs Quantity: The Mass Production Market

In a highly globalized world, most production and industrial companies tend to be large international conglomerates, branching to various fields. It can usually be seen that when it comes to a certain sector, even competing interests are ultimately be owned by the same parent body, when glanced up the hierarchy of governance of the company.

In the case of companies that engage in mass production of consumer goods, large companies rake in massive annual revenues and profits, especially in the case of essential goods. In such a case, and if the tendency for a monopolized market is greater for that particular item, how important is the ever-important debate of quality vs quantity?

The expression ‘mass production’ in itself refers to quantity. However, is it determinable that quality and quantity are opposite competing interests, or can they both be achieved in the same product while still maintaining the cost factor? Look here if you are looking for some information regarding ISO 9001 accreditation.

When quantity-based mass production is considered, standards of quality has become a significant issue. this is due to the fact that companies that garner high revenues for items that are for example unique to their own production (and does not have any significant competitors in that market) may make monopolization efforts, and this may lead to the production of a large quantity of cheap goods that a consumer is usually left with no choice but to purchase, to meet their needs. This is one of the most serious concerns of the production sector today.

To ensure that companies do not use this unfair advantage against the consumer, many ‘standards’ of quality can be called upon. The most significant of these is the ISO certification Australia offered by the International Organization for Standardization. This organization provides a criteria of specific standards and requirements to be met by that company. This certification, however, is not law, and is only a guideline. However, companies do follow this set guideline of standards in order to receive the certification which they are allowed to display and market on their product as a ‘seal’ of quality. This assists the customer in choosing the best quality product for the most affordable price when purchasing a good.

This also ensures that malpractices such as mass production of low quality goods made of materials that are potentially dangerous or harmful due to their poor quality (such as flammable materials), are not used as a way of cutting costs by the production company, ensuring the safety of the consumer was well as the manufacturing workplace of the company that handles these hazardous materials.